PrEP FAQ

PrEP, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis, is a safe and effective way to prevent HIV infection. PrEP has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection from sex by more than 90 percent.

PrEP yourself with these simple step:

  • Getting tested
  • Taking one pill each day to keep HIV from reproducing in your body
  •  Using condoms always
  • Taking charge of your sexual health to stay HIV negative

 PrEP is part of an HIV prevention toolkit that includes knowing your status and being aware of your sexual health.

  • Limiting partners
  • Never sharing needles
  • Using condoms the right time every time when you have vaginal, anal and oral sex
  • Geting tested and treated for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s)

In addition to PrEP, there are several effective ways to reduce your risk of HIV infection:

  • Get tested and know your partner’s HIV status. Talk to your partner about HIV testing and get tested before you have sex.
  • Practice safer sex. Oral sex is much less risky than anal or vaginal sex. Anal sex is the most risky type of sex for HIV transmission.
  • Use condoms. Use a condom correctly every time you have vaginal, anal or oral sex.
  • Get tested and treated for STIs. Insist that your partners get tested and treated too. Having an STI can increase your risk of becoming infected with HIV or spreading it to others.
  • Don’t share needles or inject drugs. But if you do, use only sterile drug injection equipment and water and never share your equipment with others.

Yes. Anyone can get HIV, but you can take steps to protect yourself from HIV infection.

  • Get tested and know your partner’s HIV status. Talk to your partner about HIV testing and get tested before you have sex.
  • Have less risky sex. Oral sex is much less risky than anal or vaginal sex. Anal sex is the most risky type of sex for HIV transmission.
  • Use condoms. Use a condom correctly every time you have vaginal, anal or oral sex.
  • Limit your number of sexual partners. The more partners you have, the more likely you are to have a partner with HIV whose HIV is not well controlled or to have a partner with a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Both of these factors can increase the risk of HIV transmission. If you have more than one sexual partner, get tested for HIV regularly.
  • Get tested and treated for STIs. Insist that your partners get tested and treated too. Having an STI can increase your risk of becoming infected with HIV or spreading it to others.
    • Talk to your health care provider about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP is an HIV prevention option for people who don’t have HIV but who are at high risk of becoming infected with HIV. PrEP works by following four simple steps:
    • Getting tested
    • Taking one pill each day to keep HIV from reproducing in your body
    • Using condoms always
    • Taking charge of your sexual health to stay HIV negative

PrEP only works if you are HIV negative.

  • Don’t inject drugs. But if you do, use only sterile drug injection equipment and water and never share your equipment with others.

Source: https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/education-materials/fact-sheets/20/48/the-basics-of-hiv-prevention

Openly and honestly. Ask how PrEP can work for you.

Talk to your health care practitioner about PrEP. Start with some of these questions:

  • Am I a good candidate for PrEP?
  • What other options can I use to lower my risk of getting HIV infection?
  • How effective would PrEP be at reducing my risk of HIV infection?
  • Are there any side effects?
  • Can PrEP help me to get pregnant safely if my partner has HIV?
  • Can I take the pill for PrEP if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?
  • Can you prescribe the pill for PrEP for me?
  • Are there ways to help me to pay for the pill for PrEP if I need assistance?
  • Are you willing to prescribe and manage the pill for PrEP for me?
  • How often will I have to be tested for HIV and other STDs?